Category: Disc herniation

Vascular vs. Neurogenic Claudication

Dr. Carlson in dark suit jacket

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD, CPE (Originally published in Hampton Roads Physicians’ Magazine) When muscles don’t get enough blood flow due to obstructed arteries, cramping pain can result simply from walking or using one’s arms. Vascular claudication (VC) is a condition typically caused by peripheral artery disease and is a debilitating problem that worsens over time…. Read more »

Can Your Foot Pain Be Caused by a Spinal Issue?

Mark W. McFarland, DO When I consult with patients about their spinal conditions, I often see them for pain which occurs in their limbs, shooting down an arm or a leg, perhaps even into the foot and toes.  These patients are typically surprised when, after x-rays and a thorough physical examination, I tell them that… Read more »

What Does a Herniated Disc Feel Like?  How Do I Know I Have One? 

Mark McFarland, MD

Mark W. McFarland, MD  This question came in over our web chat and it is a great one to answer. The human spine is made up of 26 vertebrae (bones) that go from your skull to your pelvis.  In between these bones are discs that act as shock absorbers or cushions which help the bones… Read more »

Polyneuropathy – What is it and how is it Caused?

Jenny L. F. Andrus, MD As an Interventional Pain Management Physician, I frequently treat patients for nerve-related pain from a variety of causes and conditions, and sometimes for undetermined reasons.  Some patients are affected by pain which comes from multiple nerves that are damaged, impinged or which simply malfunction in different parts of the body,… Read more »

I Just Had Orthopaedic Surgery, so Why Does My Throat Hurt So Badly?

Dr. Jeffrey Carlson

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD The title of this article is a question that was asked recently by a patient over our webchat line that I thought would make a fantastic topic for discussion.  I often hear this complaint from my patients as I am a spine surgeon and the requirements for spine surgery anesthesia are… Read more »

What is a Nerve Conduction Study?

Jenny L.F. Andrus, MD Physicians order many diagnostic tests to help them pinpoint exactly what condition or illness a patient may have when the answer isn’t immediately clear. A Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) is basically that – a way of determining the speed and intensity of nerve signals being carried away from the brain, through… Read more »

Five Signs to Take Neck Pain Seriously

Mark W. McFarland, DO I’m certain that there isn’t one of us who hasn’t had neck pain at some point in their life – we’ve slept funny and woke up with a “crick” in our neck or we painted the ceiling, or we did something that made our neck hurt.  Usually, with a little TLC,… Read more »

Physical Therapy After Spine Surgery

Cody Leeworthy, DPT

Cody Leeworthy PT, DPT Having a spine surgery used to be considered one of the scariest major surgeries a patient could have.  Nowadays, with the skill of OSC spine surgeons, incredible advancements in surgical technique and pain management, OSC patients can go into our ambulatory surgery center in Newport News, VA and walk out several… Read more »

What is a Myelogram?

Mark McFarland, MD

Mark W. McFarland, DO As a spine specialist and surgeon, x-ray and MRI are pretty much the tools of my trade; however, I occasionally need more detail or different detail than they can provide.  That’s when I order a Myelogram.  In this article, I will discuss what a Myelogram is, why it is ordered, what… Read more »