Category: Open MRI

Cervical Dislocation Fracture – Part Three – Urgent Treatment

Mark McFarland, MD

Mark W. McFarland, DO What happens to the patient from the scene of the accident, during transport to the hospital and after they make it to the hospital trauma unit?  In this article, I’ll talk about treatment for this type of cervical fracture and how we start to put the pieces back together for the… Read more »

What is a Segmental Fracture and How is it Treated?

Dr. Boyd Haynes, III

Boyd W. Haynes III, MD A segmental fracture is one where there are at least two fracture lines in a bone and a “segment” of separated bone in-between those fracture lines. Sometimes these medical definitions make sense!   They typically happen in the long bones of the arms and legs but can happen elsewhere in the… Read more »

Cervical Dislocation Fracture – Part II – The Symptoms

Mark W. McFarland, DO In part one of this article series, we discussed what a cervical dislocation fracture is, how it can happen and exactly how serious of an injury it can be.  In part two, I’d like to discuss the symptoms of a cervical dislocation fracture and how a tiny distance can make a… Read more »

Bone Fractures

Dr .Joel Stewart

Joel D. Stewart, MD One of the first things you learn as a physician in Orthopaedics is how to repair or fix fractured bones.  In medical lingo, we call this “reduction”.  In this article, I’m going to discuss the ten types of fractures and how they are classified by mechanism of injury and description.  They… Read more »

What is a Burst (Axial) Fracture of the Spine?

Mark W. McFarland, MD One of the first things you learn in medical school is that human bones can withstand lots of punishment, but they also can break in a lot of different ways.  Spinal bones (vertebrae) tend to break in specific ways, and some can be more serious than others.  In this article, I’m… Read more »

Can Your Foot Pain Be Caused by a Spinal Issue?

Mark W. McFarland, DO When I consult with patients about their spinal conditions, I often see them for pain which occurs in their limbs, shooting down an arm or a leg, perhaps even into the foot and toes.  These patients are typically surprised when, after x-rays and a thorough physical examination, I tell them that… Read more »

Five Commonly Believed Myths about “Pinched” Nerves in the Spine

Dr. Carlson in the operating room

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD, CPE As a spine surgeon, I answer questions from patients daily having to do with spine-related issues.  I also find that I must frequently correct misinformation or commonly held beliefs about pinched nerves and how they impact the body.  In this article, I thought it would be prudent to address some… Read more »

I have a Spinal Cord Stimulator – What are my Limitations?

Raj N. Sureja, MD The use of Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) or Neuromodulation has been a life changer for hundreds of thousands of individuals around the world – providing pain relief and a return to a better quality of life when medications, interventional procedures and even surgery may have failed.  While there have been innumerable… Read more »

What Does a Herniated Disc Feel Like?  How Do I Know I Have One? 

Mark McFarland, MD

Mark W. McFarland, MD  This question came in over our web chat and it is a great one to answer. The human spine is made up of 26 vertebrae (bones) that go from your skull to your pelvis.  In between these bones are discs that act as shock absorbers or cushions which help the bones… Read more »

The Shortage of Imaging Contrast Dye Does Not Impact Care at OSC

Dr. Jeffrey Carlson

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD Over the past few months, you may have heard about a shortage of contrast dye used in some forms of diagnostic imaging studies. This shortage is due to COVID-19 pandemic manufacturing facility shutdowns in Shanghai, China where a specific type of contrast dye – iodinated IV contrast – is produced. Because… Read more »