Category: Outpatient Procedure

Untreated Bone Fractures – Finally, The Treatment – Part III

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD CPE In the last two articles, I’ve reviewed the reasons why bone fracture can go untreated and what happens to the human body as a result.  In this last segment, I will address what can be done for those fractures that are finally given proper medical attention. Non-union – this means… Read more »

Why is a Tourniquet Used in Knee Joint Replacement Surgeries?

Total joint replacement

Boyd W. Haynes III, MD Everyone knows that a tourniquet reduces or completely restricts blood flow.  We all learned that watching TV westerns, like Gunsmoke. Expendable guest stars regularly got bitten by the token diamondback rattler while crossing through Death Valley. They quickly tied on a tourniquet to slow the venom’s progress through the bloodstream… Read more »

Vascular vs. Neurogenic Claudication

Dr. Carlson in dark suit jacket

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD, CPE (Originally published in Hampton Roads Physicians’ Magazine) When muscles don’t get enough blood flow due to obstructed arteries, cramping pain can result simply from walking or using one’s arms. Vascular claudication (VC) is a condition typically caused by peripheral artery disease and is a debilitating problem that worsens over time…. Read more »

What is a Comminuted Fracture and How is it Treated?

Dr. Burrow demonstrating the knee to a patient

John D. Burrow, DO One of the more complicated types of bone fracture to treat is the comminuted fracture.  This is where the bone breaks into three or more pieces, typically caused by a high-force accident or trauma, such as a fall from a height, a motor vehicle crash, or a contact sports injury.  Often… Read more »

Transverse Process Fracture of the Spine

Jeffrey R. Carlson, MD, CPE Most of you are familiar enough with human anatomy to know that the spine has bones called vertebrae that are stacked upon one another, sandwiched between vertebral discs that help us walk upright, bear our weight, bend, and even let us perform gymnastics if necessary. However, many people don’t know… Read more »

What is a Burst (Axial) Fracture of the Spine?

Mark W. McFarland, MD One of the first things you learn in medical school is that human bones can withstand lots of punishment, but they also can break in a lot of different ways.  Spinal bones (vertebrae) tend to break in specific ways, and some can be more serious than others.  In this article, I’m… Read more »

What is an Oblique Fracture and How is it Treated?

Robert J. Snyder, MD An oblique fracture is one that breaks diagonally across the width of the bone and along the longitudinal axis of the bone.  Because of the shape of the bone fracture, the edges of the bone are typically quite sharp and knife-like and can cause lacerations to the skin over the fracture,… Read more »

Five Bad Habits That Exacerbate Knee Pain

Dr. Bob Snyder

Robert J. Snyder, MD As an Orthopaedic physician, I spend my days looking at, diagnosing and treating musculoskeletal issues, and believe me, I have seen and taken care of more knees than I can count. Let’s discuss the bad habits you should avoid if you want be good to your knees for life! Bad Habit… Read more »

The Top Six Reasons My Hip Replacement Patients Do Well in Recovery

Dr. Haynes ready for surgery

Boyd W. Haynes III, MD I’m celebrating 30 years in practice with OSC this month and I’ve performed a lot of hip replacement surgeries in those years.  I’m going to share with you the “wisdom” I’ve accumulated in all those years as to why some patient sail through hip replacement recovery and others don’t.  So,… Read more »

I have a Spinal Cord Stimulator – What are my Limitations?

Raj N. Sureja, MD The use of Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) or Neuromodulation has been a life changer for hundreds of thousands of individuals around the world – providing pain relief and a return to a better quality of life when medications, interventional procedures and even surgery may have failed.  While there have been innumerable… Read more »